On Superstitions Connected with the History and Practice of Medicine and Surgery by Thomas Joseph Pettigrew

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Author
Thomas Joseph Pettigrew
Publisher
Theclassics.Us
Date of release
Pages
50
ISBN
9781230383859
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
63

Book review

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ... to his hamac for six weeks. In Persia, when a woman is about to lie in, the schoolmasters are requested to give liberty to their boys, and birds confined in cages are permitted to escape. Charlevoix says that when the women of Maroc perceive labour-pains, the neighbours select five schoolboys, and tie four eggs in the four corners of a napkin, with which the boys run singing through the streets. Child's Caul. In this and some other countries when a child is born with the caul or amnion over its face, it is preserved with great care and regarded as ominous of good fortune to the infant, and also as valuable to any one who may become possessed of it, enabling them, to avoid many serious dangers. " II est ne coiffe," is a French proverb applied to lucky people. In Scotland, according to Ruddiman,J it is called a haly or sely how, a holy or fortunate cap or hood. A midwife in Scotland is called a howdy or howdy wife. The virtues of the caul are described as various; it renders advocates eloquent, saves the possessor from having his house destroyed by fire, or being himself drowned. It is therefore much in request with seafaring people, and may be seen among the advertisements of our newspapers when to be disposed of at a considerable price. Homer in Hymn. Apoll. v. 14. t See on this subject the works of Biet, Du Tertre, Thevet, Lafitau, I'roger, Boulanger, &c. Similar accounts are to be found in the writings of Diodorus Siculus, Apollonius, and Strabo. X Glossary to Douglas's Virgil. Cramp. For this affection many charms in verse are extant. The following is from Pepys's ' Diary:' " Cramp, be thou faintless, As our Lady was sinless When she bare Jesus." Rings have, however, constituted the principal means for the...


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